Photographer and documentary filmmaker

about-me2

I graduated Ethnology at Paris X Nanterre and Documentary Film Making at Paris VII Diderot. I also followed a technician audio-visual course at École Supérieure de Réalisation Audiovisuelle at Rennes, and a long term course on Photography at Centre d’Arts Plastiques et Visuels at Lille.

My passion for image and cinema is influenced by my background in ethnology and by the direct cinema genre (Wiseman, Rouch, Depardon), as well as by fiction cinema (Tarkovski, Cassavetes, Bresson).

 My different professional experiences led me to work in the field of documentary film production, in a library specialized in photography and art collections, and finally as a freelance videographer and photographer.

 For over 15 years, I wandered across every corner of the Balkans, Eastern Europe, Russia and Central Asia. I left parts of me everywhere, I also lived in some of these countries and I finally decided to stay longer in Romania. My first trip here, in 2001, was a cultural shock, an explosion of the senses. I met a civilization at times brutal, at times generous, and never indifferent.

 I dedicated my MA dissertation in Ethnology to the familial organization of Roma Gabor of Transylvania. Few years later, I explored the daily life of a small remote village in Transylvania in my first feature documentary “Quiet Days in Băgaciu” (trailer), which was selected in the DOC-Outlook International Market (DOCM) in Nyon, Switzerland.

Since 2014, I have been living in Romania, where I practiced as a documentary filmmaker and photographer. After living in Bucharest for a few years, I moved to Sibiu in 2017 to continue my activity in the region of Transylvania. Oriented by my interest in politics, ecology and socio-cultural topics, I mostly do reportages about social movements, events (concerts, festivals), as well as landscape, portrait, architecture photography. I also collaborate with music groups, Romanian newspapers, media online and blogs.

Filming and photographing are sustained by the same desire and articulated in the same artistic gesture: transmitting by the means of image the singularity of a landscape, an encounter or a speech. I conceive this art as a form of engagement to make heard the voices of those forgotten and as a means to reveal other things than the “obvious” that often crosses our impatient and distracted regards.